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Food defence: refining the taxonomy of food defence threats

Manning, L. (2019) Food defence: refining the taxonomy of food defence threats. Trends in Food Science & Technology, 85. pp. 107-115.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2019.01.008

Abstract

Background Awareness of the need to address food defence is gaining pace in the food industry. Indeed implementing an effective food defence strategy is a key pre-requisite to comply with third party certification standards. There is however a knowledge gap with regard to the types of threat that fall within the scope of a food defence strategy and also how these issues can then be mitigated and where possible eliminated. Scope and approach This research seeks to position food defence as a supply chain risk mitigation strategy and use case studies of real-world issues to frame the taxonomy of food defence threats. Key findings In order to differentiate food defence threats (food attack) from wider food crime, the research postulates that food defence strategies needs to address intentional adulteration to gain personal attention, to gain financial reward through extortion or to gain attention for a particular cause or ideology i.e. food terrorism. More covert threats include sabotage, espionage, intellectual property theft, and cybercrime, including hacktivism. These threats can cause actual harm to individuals, members of certain populations and communities or to organisations. This can lead to large scale, economic, political or social unrest and disruption of the supply chain and thus fit within the scope of food defence activities. To inform food defence risk assessment and management processes, this taxonomy needs to be developed and accepted across the food industry so that threats can be consistently and effectively addressed and as a result consumers, industry partners, shareholders and also the organisation itself can be protected.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Food Science and Agri-food Supply Chain Management
Depositing User: Ms Kath Osborn
Date Deposited: 12 Feb 2019 16:42
Last Modified: 12 Feb 2019 16:42
URI: http://hau.collections.crest.ac.uk/id/eprint/17376

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